Bergeon 6767-F Spring Bar Tool Review

By: Andrew Gatto

Of all the watchmaking and repair tools on the market today, the spring bar tool is arguably the most well known and one of the first accessories watch owners purchase. Although it is not always required (depending on the style of spring bar), a good spring bar tool will allow mere novices to quickly remove and install straps while greatly reducing the likelihood of scratching their watch case in the process. This review will cover my experience with the Bergeon 6767-F spring bar tool and how it compares to lower cost brands available online at a fraction of its price.

History of Bergeon Watch Tools

Bergeon has been manufacturing tools, equipment, and furniture for watchmakers and enthusiasts in Switzerland since 1791. Located in La Chaux-de-Fonds Switzerland, Bergeon employs over 60 people to research, design, and manufacture tools that watchmakers around the world depend on to provide consistent results for their customers. If watchmakers have trusted Bergeon for over 2 centuries, I was confident that their spring bar tool would be a perfect addition to my small collection of basic watch tools.

Versions of the 6767 Spring Bar Tool

Bergeon produces several different product lines of spring bar tools such as “Heavy Duty” and “Next Generation”, however, the 6767 line is the most popular due to its simplicity and affordable price. Within the 6767 spring bar tool line, they offer three different models to choose from depending on the style of watch band you are removing.

Three Versions of the Bergeon 6767 Spring Bar Tool

    • 6767-S (Standard) includes a 3.0mm forked tip and a 0.8mm pointed tip
    • 6767-F (Fine) includes a 1.2mm forked tip and a 0.8mm pointed tip
    • 6767-SF (Standard and Fine) includes a 3.0mm forked tip and a 1.2mm forked tip

If you will be removing heavy leather or rubber straps, the wider forked tip on the 6767-S will allow you to push the strap away from the lugs to give you access to the spring bar. The wider fork will also help prevent damaging leather or rubber by not digging into the material as much as a finer fork would. Conversely, the 6767-F is best for removing metal bracelets because its thinner forked tip will allow you to access the small spring bar openings found on bracelets. The pointed tip on both models allow you to push spring bars through drilled lugs and micro adjust holes on clasps. If you have no need for a pointed tip, the 6767-SF allows you to remove leather/rubber and steel bracelets since it has both the wide and thin forked tips.

For my purposes I decided to go with the Bergeon 6767-F Spring Bar Tool.


 
 

First Impressions of The 6767-F

The Bergeon 6767-F comes in a simple plastic snap closure package with a paper insert describing the tool and options for replacement tips. The packaging is durable enough to reuse and keep the spring bar tool safe when not being used. When removing the tool from the package, it is immediately evident that Bergeon has created yet another top quality tool for watch owners. Weighing in at a hefty 27 grams, the 6767-F feels nicely balanced in the hand and gives you a sense of quality like no other spring bar tool I’ve used.

Quality of Construction

Bergeon choose to construct the handle body of the 6767-F from one solid piece of stainless steel to ensure durability and a lifetime of use. Machined knurled finger grips are located towards both ends of the body to allow you to securely grip the tool no matter which end you are using. These grips work wonders since any unintended movement, no matter how small, can lead to scratching the watch case or bracelet.

The one-piece tips are machined from hardened tempered steel and are made to the Swiss level of quality we’ve come to expect. They are flawlessly finished with no burrs or rough edges unlike the lower quality alternatives on the market. Both the fork and pin tips have a long threaded base to screw into the body. The long threads are secured deep into the handle body to ensure the tips are able to withstand the high torque and pressure need to remove strong spring bars.

Using the Bergeon Spring Bar Tool

Using the 6767-F to remove spring bars is as easy as one could expect. The high precision forked tip allows you to firmly grip the spring bar’s flange with confidence so you can ease it out of the lug hole without fear of slipping. After many strap changes, the forked tip has no signs of damage or deformation which is a testament to Bergeon’s high quality. This is in vast contrast to the lower quality spring bar tools many watch owners purchase. The tips on most of these tools will bend, deform and even break after just a few uses. It is very disconcerting when you are trying to remove a spring bar without scratching your watch and the tip literally begins to deform in your hand.

However, the Bergeon 6767-F provides the user a strong and reliable tool that will make you feel comfortable using it on a regular basis. Since I have no watches with fully drilled lugs, I have not had the chance to use the pointed tip yet. However, it appears to be just as high quality as the forked tip (being made from one-piece of machined hardened tempered steel). During use, I have not found the tips to unscrew themselves loose from the handle body. They remain solidly attached and having them turn or fall out is not a concern.

Final Thoughts on the 6767-F

Overall, this spring bar tool exceeds my expectations when it comes to quality and ease of use. It will no doubt last a lifetime, especially since the tips can be replaced if they become worn out. The saying “You get what you pay for” is perfectly fitting for the 6767-F; the cheap spring bar tools don’t compare to the quality you get by spending a little more on this Swiss made Bergeon. It has performed flawlessly removing and installing steel bracelets, perlon straps, and rubber straps on both my dress and sport watches. I look forward to tossing my cheap spring bar tool straight into the wastebasket where it belongs because the 6767-F is the perfect companion for a lifetime of watch collecting. Check out Amazon’s prices on the 6767 below.



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